Mayor Garcetti Announces Federal Designation, $700,000 Grant To Assist Disconnected Youth

Mayor Eric Garcetti today announced that the Obama Administration has selected Los Angeles as a Performance Partnership Pilot for Disconnected Youth (P3), a designation that allows local and state governments to pilot improved ways of assisting disconnected youth with federal dollars.

Performance Partnership Pilot status gives agencies added flexibility in the use of discretionary funds across multiple federal programs. The designation comes with a $700,000 grant to fund a planning effort — led by the city’s Economic & Workforce Development Department — that will bring together local and federal agencies to provide wraparound services to improve education, employment, and social outcomes for youth with a history of homelessness, chronic school absenteeism, or involvement in the criminal justice system.

“There are few things more meaningful or impactful than giving young people new opportunities to achieve and second chances to succeed,” said Mayor Garcetti. “The Performance Partnership Pilot will enable L.A. to show the nation how we can strengthen service delivery to our most vulnerable youth — through stronger partnerships, and by breaking down jurisdictional boundaries.”

The multi-agency partnership will map out ways to bolster collaboration between the Economic & Workforce Development Department, the Los Angeles Unified School District, the Los Angeles Community College District, and Los Angeles County.

“LAUSD is proud to partner to bring essential services to the youth that need them the most,” said LAUSD Board President Steve Zimmer. “Allowing increased flexibility will ensure that more young people are reached and that they are better served.”

“I want to applaud Mayor Garcetti and the City for taking the lead on this important program,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. “Disconnected youth will benefit greatly from the kind of supportive teams made possible through this innovative collaboration between City, County, and LAUSD.”

In addition to enhancing local partnerships, six federal agencies — the U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Justice Department, as well as the Corporation for National and Community Services and the Institute of Museum and Library Services — are committed to working with Los Angeles officials to align resources, provide waivers, and help identify new opportunities to improve service delivery outcomes to disconnected youth.

The effort to secure P3 status for L.A. resulted from the City’s engagement with President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative. It was also supported by LA n Sync, founded by the Annenberg Foundation, which provided technical assistance in the application process and helped assemble various sectors to help pursue the opportunity.

“We are confident that this award will have a tremendously positive impact on our region’s most disenfranchised youth,” said Annenberg Foundation Executive Director Cinny Kennard.

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