Office of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

Homelessness in Los Angeles

“WE CAN'T JUST BUILD WALLS AND FLOORS, WE HAVE TO REBUILD LIVES.”

- Mayor Eric Garcetti


 

2017 Point-In-Time (PIT) Count:

The PIT Count is mandated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and gives us a snapshot of homelessness in LA. It takes place annually in the last 10 days of January and includes a street count, shelter count, youth count and demographic survey. Results helps us answer key questions about homelessness in LA, including how many people are experiencing homelessness, their demographics, and distribution across the region.

Homelessness Is In Every Community

 

Service Planning Area  

Population

San Fernando Valley

7,627

Metro LA

15,393

West LA

5,511

South LA

9,243

East LA (County)

5,189

South Bay

6,145

 

Homelessness Impacts All Populations

 

Ages

62 & Older - 7%

55 - 61 - 16%

25-54 - 60%

18-24 - 9%

Under 18 - 8%

 

Gender

Male - 68%

Female - 31%

Transgender - 1%

Does not identify as male, female, or transgender - 0.3%

 

Race/Ethnicity

American Indian/Alaska Native - 1%

Asian - 1%

Black/African American - 47%

Hispanic/Latino - 30%

Native Hawaiian/ Other Pacific Islander - 0.3%

White - 18%

Multi-Racial/Other - 2%

 

Coordinated Entry System

Addressing the homelessness crisis requires coordination between public, private and nonprofit sectors. There are many organizations working to address homelessness by increasing permanent supportive housing, an evidence-based intervention, increasing coordination of street outreach, and increasing participation with the Coordinated Entry System, a best practice to ensure the right person is placed in the right housing unit.

 

Types of Housing
 

Permanent Supportive Housing

Permanent Supportive Housing is an evidence-based housing model that improves the quality of life for persons experiencing homelessness with mental, physical, and substance abuse disorders, and the health and wealth of the entire community.

Rapid Rehousing

Low barrier programs that provide financial assistance and services, such as security deposits, move‐in assistance, short‐ or medium‐term rental subsidies, to help those who are experiencing homelessness be quickly re‐housed and stabilized. This is best fit for those that just need a little assistance getting back on their feet and are not in need of long term supportive services.

Interim/Bridge Housing

A housing intervention that provides an interim residence to participants while they work with housing navigators to become document ready and matched with appropriate permanent housing.

 

City Homeless Budget

Total for 2017-2018: $179,954,488